Greenway Brings Residents A Much Better Path to Follow

By On December 4, 2011

Walking along the new pathway is former Mayor Marsha Ramos, Gary Hildebrand Director LA County Public Works, and Mayor Jess Talamantes. ( Photo by Ross A. Benson)

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Residents of the Lake/Alameda neighborhood joined Burbank Mayor Jess Talamantes and a host of County and City officials Saturday to mark completion of the Lake/Alameda Greenway Project. The $1.7 million project, funded by the LA County Flood Control District and City of Burbank, brings lush, park-like amenities and open space to a well-deserving neighborhood..

Residents will now enjoy access to a quarter-mile, meandering pedestrian path running along the east side of the flood control channel from Alameda Ave. to Victory Blvd. It featues landscaping with colorful, native drought-tolerant plants and trees; and improved lighting. There is now access from Spazier, Elm, and Linden Avenues with imporvd connectivety to Alameda Ave. and Victory Blvd. The pathway also has doggy stations.

LA County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, a longtime advocate of the project, noted that the area will bring members of the Lake Alameda community closer together, increase their access to recreational opportunities and provide a safe corridor for school children.

Walking along the newly opened greenbelt pathway. ( Photo by Ross A. Benson)

“The transformation of this corridor from a blighted area to a $1.7 million community treasure is truly remarkable and made possible only through the partnership we share with the City of Burbank and its residents,” Supervisor Antonovich said.

Lake/Alameda is located along Burbank’s southeast border. Protecting this community and many others from flooding is the Burbank Western Channel, which funnels stormwater away from city streets and off to the Los Angeles River.

While the channel provides a valuable service to local homes and businesses, the area adjacent to the channel between West Alameda Ave. and South Victory Blvd. had become blighted over the years with invasive plants and trash. Working with the City of Burbank, Flood Control District engineers recognized the site’s potential as a habitat corridor for migrating wildlife and park-like environment for local residents.

“We are proud to dedicate this new and important greenway,” says Burbank Mayor Jess Talamantes. “We work to provide open space and recreational opportunities for residents in every corner of the City and this collaborative project continues that mission.”

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