Tag Archives: Flashback Friday

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank’s Original Library

The Library can be seen just to the left of Bell Jeff High School

On Olive ave. where part of Bellermine Jefferson High School has the end of its building once stood the original main Library for Burbank. There had been several store front type locations for the BPL but this was to be its permanent location.

california centennial float 1950 in front of Burbank Public Library on olive ave closer look with ladiesjpg

Constructed in a beautiful Spanish style it was a showcase for books and events alike.

One huge event was the 100th anniversary of the State of California. Artifacts from early California were on display and a float depicting California History was provided by the State and parked out front of the Library.

About the new library the City had this to say…

It was apparent to all concerned that the Burbank Library needed a permanent building in order to grow. City fathers at the time looked to the future and realized the importance of a library to an expanding community.

Since the beginning of the charter government in 1927, Burbank had been accumulating building funds for a permanent facility. Despite being in the depths of the Great Depression, a new library building was erected at 425 East Olive Avenue in 1935.

The City provided the land, and the building was completed with S.E.R.A. (State Emergency Relief Administration) funds.

The structure of approxi­mately 6,700 square feet was built at a cost of $33,000 – with­out debt or bonds– through the cooperation of the Burbank City Council, City Manager Howard I. Stites, and the Library Board.

night shot durring the 100th California Anniversary

Library service in the new building was still under a year-to-year contract with the Los Ange­les County Library.

The budget projected for the 1936-1937 fiscal year was expected to be $6,000, more than half of that in salaries. Mrs. Ripley, the full-time librar­ian, earned a salary of $120.63 a week. A full-time Assistant, two part-time assistants, and a Page rounded out the staff of the new library.

Once finished the Library was a Beautiful and Grand Structure and the Burbank citizens began using it immediately upon opening. The first year they had 7,382 borrowers who checked out (or Circulated) the 12,711 books 134,217 times that year.

the new addition with the brick patio still there today with the outer wall removed

The library had to be added to in the coming years and a large patio made of brick was added also for outdoor events. The patio still remains a part of today’s main library on the Olive Ave. side where there is a time capsule and a bust of Dr. Burbank.

We would like to thank  Louise Paziak of the Burbank Public Library for help with the stats and several of the photographs.

Coming in November of 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Your Burbank Home

Back in June we talked about the “WELCOME TO BURBANK” signs that graced the entry points to the City as you crossed the border into town.

While enjoyable to see they were not very helpful.

In 1928 however, the Burbank Merchants Association found a more personal and helpful way to introduce you to your new home. In the mid to late 1920’s there was a housing boom and growth brought people to settle here.

With Lockheed coming to town a year later and a new airport coming in 1930, Moreland Trucks being built here prospects for work and homes were great. The Burbank Merchants developed a 56 page booklet that contained a complete history of Burbank from the Rancho Days to the present (1928) with many pictures.

It of course contained Full, Half, and quarter page ads for local businesses, but it also talked about the Schools, City Government, Fire, Police, Recreation, Movie Theaters, Clubs, Church’s, Golf Course, Womens & Mens organizations & places to get work.

The Book was a great way to learn about your new home town then and is still a Great read today! Here are some pictures and you can read the entire booklet at http://www.mbmcdaniel.com/burbankia/your_burbank_home.pdf

Coming in November of 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Redcar from Burbank to Los Angeles

1955 Orange Grove and Glenoaks

2017 Orange Grove and Glenoaks

My friend and co-author Wes received from his Father In Law Don Bilyeu BHS class of 1945, a slide series by Ira Swett in which a photographic trip of the red car from Los Angeles on Broadway to Orange Grove and Glenoaks in Burbank from 1955.

The slides are very clear and give us an idea what it was like to take a trip to and from L.A. back then via electric trolley.

The Red Car stopped service in 1956 but it is an Idea whose time has come around again. On Glenoaks the Green median from Providencia through Glendale is a reminder of this once great transportation system and how it helped shape the cities we have today.

Let’s look at the Burbank slides and how the same places look today.

1955 Glenoaks and Providencia

2017 Glenoaks and Providencia

You may follow the rest of the Journey to Downtown Los Angeles here https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipOl2nYkhgebYjlsPl_3UcjcFy5WVdycO-l7vFont7pmGeuUY3Z4khPsWEu2rYgftw?key=UW44akZLeUJJX0Z2VG85bU91SjFDNEdoWWRUT25R  The rest of the slides show an interesting view of how commuting was back in vintage Burbank and Los Angeles. You will love all the vintage cars in many of the slides. Be sure to click each slide to expand it then click the little “i” in the upper right hand corner to get more information about the slide and enjoy the ride!

1955 Cedar and Glenoaks

2017 Cedar and Glenoaks

Coming in November of 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Remembering Burbank’s Sacrifice for Our Country

Since World War One Burbank Citizens have heeded the call of our country in times of war.

(Photo by Ross A. Benson)

We as a community have suffered loses of our young men and women in the service to keep us free from tyranny and oppression and to help free others from that oppression also.

This has come at a steep cost and many a Burbank home has known the pain of losing a loved one. The names of those who gave all are forever inscribed on the Memorial at Mc Cambridge Park that is marked by the eternal flame of remembrance.

Each Memorial Day the names of those who were lost are read aloud and a Red Rose placed on their monument to assure that their names ring out in our city once again so their sacrifice is not forgotten.

In other cities in far off countries our city’s sons are also remembered each year on the day their town was liberated.

In Mont-Dol France Burbank’s Quentin Sandahl is remembered on this Monument by the placing of flowers by the local towns people.

Another such monument is in the Netherlands to Burbank’s  Warren F. Neilson by placing a wreath on the center of a propeller from his plane by the local towns people who made the propeller a central part of the monument.

Our Burbank lost sons are remembered in many other places across the globe too numerous to mention here.

Let us however this memorial day locally pause and remember those whose days were cut short so ours would be long and free of oppression from evil.

If you are local please come to the Mc Cambridge Memorial at 11 am Monday to take a few moments out of your long weekend to honor those from our great town who gave so much for freedom. It is a small way to remember their sacrifice that their names will be in your memories as we celebrate them this weekend.

For a more in-depth look at each person you may read about them and see many of their photos here…

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank’s Own Song

Way back in the 1920’s Burbank and the Chamber of Commerce decided the City needed its own theme song.

Yes that is right! Our own song!

Have you ever sung or heard it played? Most likely not, but it is a fun toe tapper and enjoyable.

The song was written by a man named Code Morgan for the Chamber of Commerce to promote Burbank and its businesses. Once you hear it, it gets stuck in your head and at the oddest times you will find yourself humming it or singing the lyrics to yourself.

It is a fun song even if it is not Grammy material!

The sheet music was printed up like a large advertisement for local businesses and people bought ads to highlight their company. The title “In Burbank” indicates that it will clue you in on the virtues of living here “Neath the mountain Crest”!

If you are truly interested in hearing a performance of this home town song I will be giving a slide presentation this Saturday afternoon at the Burbank Historical Society Gordon Howard Museum at Olive Rec at 2 pm.

One of the highlights will be a performance of “In Burbank” followed by a sing along of this piece of wonderful Burbank history.

Join us for a fun time discussing our Book “Lost Burbank” by Wes Clark and myself. You will also receive a souvenir copy of the sheet music you see below.

Soon you will be singing and tapping your foot to this old time Burbank song!

Burbank Historical Society presents

LOST BURBANK
By Michael McDaniel

The places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story.  Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built its original studio lot on Olive Avenue in 1926.  For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands.  Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue.  Join die-hard Burbanker Michael McDaniel share theses and many more fascinating stories about “Lost Burbank”!

When:  Saturday, May 20, 2017 @ 2:00 pm

Where: Cunningham Room of the Gordon R. Howard Museum
Free parking behind George Izay Park
In the lot off Clark Street
(818) 841-6333

Admission:  FREE

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank Was Once Wine Country

In the early days of Burbank a number of farmers found that the soil in Burbank was good for growing grapes. Many of these early Burbankers began to produce locally made wine from the grapes. At one time the Hillsides of the Verdugo’s were covered in grape arbors.

One immigrant Family from Italy, the Grangetto family, were said to have moved to America specifically to Burbank because they heard that the area was great for producing wine.

Jefferson Elementary School was once the grounds of Gai’s Winery.

Every now and then an old Burbank Wine Bottle shows up on Ebay and they make a great decoration for your home.

Mrs Angela Brusso Crushing Grapes in 1957

The last winery in Burbank was the Brusso Winery. Located on Thornton Street near the Burbank Airport was in business until around 1967. The names of some of the other Burbank wineries are Gai, McClure, Randisi, Grangetto and Brusso.

My Brother in Law was working once on the Azusa city hall remodeling project with his construction company and found several empty bottles of wine from Burbanks Gai’s winery.

Apparently the original workers were fans of Burbank wine!

J Burbank wine came in your normal size bottles and also by the gallon Jug so next time you are on Ebay or at your local swap meet or flea market keep your eyes peeled for those old bottles of Burbanks Finest!

Burbank Historical Society presents

LOST BURBANK
By Michael McDaniel

The places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story.  Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built its original studio lot on Olive Avenue in 1926.  For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands.  Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue.  Join die-hard Burbanker Michael McDaniel share theses and many more fascinating stories about “Lost Burbank”!

When:  Saturday, May 20, 2017 @ 2:00 pm

Where: Cunningham Room of the Gordon R. Howard Museum
Free parking behind George Izay Park
In the lot off Clark Street
(818) 841-6333

Admission:  FREE

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: The Beach Boys Burbank Connection

If you have ever listened to a Beach Boys Greatest Hits Record (yes I said Record) or you have heard this song on classic radio, you can’t forget the lively tune and the chorus “Be True to Your School…”!

All of this was brought about by Burbank High School Drill team member and super loyal student Jodi Gable. Here is her story as related in the book “The Blue and White Wave High” 2008 for the BHS Centennial…

Jodi Gable 1964

As a child growing up in Burbank, Jodi Gable (Class of 1965) fondly remembers the grape arbors that filled the hillside above her house and describes her life as living in “a Norman Rockwell painting.” When Jodi was 13 she met the Beach Boys at an Olive Rec Center dance and was amazed at their sound. After talking with them they asked her to head up their fan club. After her parents met the Wilsons (parents of Brian, Dennis and Carl), Jodi began hanging out with the boys, who treated her like a sister, and building fan support.

“I loved BHS and couldn’t wait to get to school each day,” she recalls. “I called Dr. Leland, ‘Unc,’ and I had teachers who really seemed to care.” Jodi was an active member of the Drill Team, and her loyalty to BHS became the genesis of one of their hits. Jodi recalls, “Brian Wilson was a genius and could come up with lyrics on the spot.

We were eating chili fries one day at an A&W in Hawthorne and he penned, ‘Fun, Fun, Fun.’” Jodi was driving the guys crazy with her drill team stories and Wilson came up with “Be True to your School” (which coincidently contains part of “On Wisconsin,” Burbank’s fight song).

On her 16th birthday, the Beach Boys threw a party and performed in her back yard.

 By the end of her junior year the band’s popularity meant greater demands on her time. Jodi left BHS and finished at Hollywood Professional School in order to work for the Beach Boys full time. At the time she was dating Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones and was in the middle of the exploding 1960’s music scene.

Eventually Jodi hired some of her classmates to join her staff and to help answer fan mail. She stayed with the band until she was twenty, and then went on to her own singing career.

 Jodi resides in Oregon with her husband, but has stayed connected to her classmates and has always remained true to her school.”

When you hear this Fun song from the golden era of surf music just remember Jodi and  Burbank High School.

( no hard feelings Burroughs J )

And just in case you have not heard this fine classic rock song here is a link! Or listen below. Enjoy, Crank it up!

 

Burbank Historical Society presents

LOST BURBANK
By Michael McDaniel

The places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story.  Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built its original studio lot on Olive Avenue in 1926.  For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands.  Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue.  Join die-hard Burbanker Michael McDaniel share theses and many more fascinating stories about “Lost Burbank”!

When:  Saturday, May 20, 2017 @ 2:00 pm

Where: Cunningham Room of the Gordon R. Howard Museum
Free parking behind George Izay Park
In the lot off Clark Street
(818) 841-6333

Admission:  FREE

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Andrew Jergens Plant

Plant in 1927

As a boy growing up here, I lived about 8 blocks up the street from the Andrew Jergens Plant.

I and my friends always had no idea of what time it was when playing outside. However we all told time the same way by the sound of the Jergens Plant break and main steam whistles. There was a deep one that signaled the 8am “start Work” sounding and the eventual work is over for today sounding at 5 pm.

In between there was a higher pitched whistle that signaled 10 am and 2pm Breaks and the High Noon lunch whistle. These alerts helped us maximize our play time and let us know when it was time to skedaddle home to avoid punishment.

Aside from the accurate time keeping the plant afforded me and my friends it also was the large local plant that produced the company’s Creams, Lotions and soaps as well as employing a large number of Burbankers.

It is always fun when you go to the store for a product and then drive by the place it was made on the way home.

We talk of other big businesses in Burbank such as Moorland Truck Co. but Jergens was every bit as big and productive.

Jergens produced their products in Burbank for over 60 years, first coming here in the mid 1920’s. The plant was located at 99 West Verdugo where Verdugo met the Railroad tracks.

I have been the proud owner of the large and small steam whistles from the top of the plant for several years. I recently donated the break whistle to the Historical society.

Plant in 1936

Part of the employees in 1931

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank’s First Real School Building

Burbank Grammar School 1913

The first school district in Burbank was established on June 3, 1879, upon petition of Mr. S. W. White and nine other citizens. It was known as Providencia School District.  It was located on Burbank Boulevard, close to what is now Mariposa Street. Dr. David Burbank gave one acre of land for this school.

At that time, there were nine families in the area who sent children to the school. The school was used until about 1887 when it was abandoned because the classes moved to a new grammar school on Magnolia Boulevard and San Fernando Road. The new building faced Magnolia.

This was the City of Burbank’s first real official school building, the old one being more of a house than a dedicated school.

The new grammar school was a two-story frame building with four classrooms upstairs and four downstairs. It had a belfry or bell tower which housed the bell that called the boys and girls of the community to school each morning.

The bell was tolled by means of a long rope, which extended down from the tower, through the building, to within reach of the principal at a point right near the front door.

Lunch Shed can be seen in back of school

At the rear of the school was a windmill and an elevated tank which stored the water pumped from the ground. The space below the water tank was framed in, and it was here that many of the boys and girls kept their bicycles.

Near the present corner of Third Street and Palm Avenue there was a lean-to carriage shed in which the youngsters kept their horses and buggies and their ponies and pony carts while they were in school.

Children came to the Burbank Grammar School from as far away as the area of Brand’s Castle in Glendale, Roscoe (now Sun Valley), and the present Warner Brothers area at the south end of town.

The school playground was the area now occupied by store buildings along the San Fernando Boulevard frontage between Magnolia Boulevard and Palm Avenue.

Burbank Grammar School, 1905

During some of the time that the Burbank Grammar School was used, the children maintained a flower garden in the area in front of the school and a vegetable garden near the shed which was used to house the horses and buggies. The care of those gardens provided practical experience for the boys and girls studying agriculture, one of the main occupations of the area at that time.

There were two lunch houses at the rear of the school, one for boys and one for girls. Each child brought in his own drinking cup (No juice boxes here!) which hung in the lunch house and, of course, the children all brought their own lunches with them each day. ( no Oscar Mayer  Bologna either!)

Games were played at recess time in the schoolyard. These included darebase, pomp-pomp-pull-away and hide and seek.  

Burbank Grammar School first grade, 1913

To enter school each morning the boys and girls lined up in separate lines at the front steps and marched into the building in time with the sound of a drum, beat by a selected pupil. (I guess he was called the Drum Monitor)

When the school first opened, there were four teachers and a principal, and the student body totaled about 200 children. The school had classes for grades one through eight.

It is hard to imagine going to school like this in modern times but we have a good number of pictures to give us an idea. I like how the kids in the photos are so serious. It was a hard life back in those days.

Burbank Grammar School, 1903

Burbank Grammar School, 1903

Love these faces!

Burbank Grammar School, 1913

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank Villa Hotel

In the early 1880’s with Burbank being divided into land parcels and dirt streets crisscrossing the new city, potential buyers needed a place to stay when coming to town to look over the land for purchase.

Dr Burbank himself took on the task of building a first class hotel for local visitors to stay.

The result was the Burbank Villa Hotel built in 1887. The L A Express Newspaper said this before it opened… “There is no handsomer hotel on the Coast than Burbank Villa, to be opened the first of next month. Architecturally considered, it is a gem and its equipment is as faultless as the style of architecture. Everything done at Burbank has been done right.”

The Burbank Villa Hotel (later called the “Santa Rosa Hotel”) quickly became the focus of Burbank’s Social life. Burbanker’s hosted weddings, parties, dances and other grand events.

The hotel was a beautiful Victorian style building, very eye catching for the times.

Visitors received 5 star treatment and enjoyed the opulence of the building and its closeness to the train station and downtown Burbank!

Many a person loved the luxury of a stay there, one such was Actress Billie Burke known better as Glinda the Good Witch from the Wizard of OZ (1939).

Alas all good things must come to an end and the hotel was torn down before 1927. The lot sat empty until the U.S. Post Office was built in 1938. The Post Office still stands there today on Olive Ave halfway between First Street and San Fernando Blvd.

I think you will agree from the pictures that have survived that this was truly a Jewel of Burbank architecture and is a shame that the building did not survive to today.

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.