First One Hundred Days Of School Marked By Washington Elementary First-Graders

By On January 28, 2016

Sixty-two first-graders at George Washington Elementary School marked the first 100 days of school on Tuesday, January 26, with several activities on the school grass field.

First grade teachers Patty Dagata, Debra Lack and Theresa White were joined by Principal Brandi Young as they lead the children in different ways to count to 100.

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

“’The First Grade 100th Day of School Physical Activities’ is an annual event in which each first grade class is a part of,” explained Dagata. “This is a day to celebrate the milestone of completing 100 days of first grade!”

“This day represents the progress, growth and achievement that each class has made so far this school year,” she added. “It offers a great opportunity for creative learning and celebration.”

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

Lack led the group of students “Taking 100 Steps” together, counting by ones.

White guided the students in “Hula Hoop Jumping.” Students jumped in and out of hula hoops while counting by twos.

Dagata taught a stretching game “Head, Shoulders, Waist, Knees and Toes.” Each student touched the appropriate body part and counted by fives. She also showed the group how to “Balance On One Foot” while counting by tens.

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

“These physical activities help to increase movement of the whole body, help children learn a variety of skills and reinforce mathematical content and cognition skills that are being taught in the classroom,” Dagata also said.

At the end of the afternoon activities, the first-graders gathered in a giant circle. Young praised them for their work so far this school year and started off the “Shaking Of 100 Hands.” Each person traveled around the circle shaking another person’s hand.

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

(Photo by © Ross A. Benson)

“In the classroom, another ‘100 Day’ activity includes each student gathering a collection of 100 small matching items (like pennies) from home,” Dagata said. “They put them in a clear plastic bottle, label it and bring them to school in a paper bag.”

“Each student writes three clues to describe what is in his or her bottle for a guessing game at school. This is a fun and educational activity that gets our students and their families doing at-home projects together.”

“Families begin using strategies to help them count these small items by organizing them into 10 groups of 10,” she concluded. “Thus, hitting home the concept that 100 is 10 tens and 0 ones!”