Tag Archives: Flashback Friday

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank’s Big Model Contest During World War II

In 1944 and 1945 Burbank Park and Recreation Dept. hosted a model airplane building contest for youth 6 to 16 years of age.

It was a big deal for the times as the judges and people helping the kids were from some big aeronautical Companies and Airlines in the local area. Lockheed, Pacific Airmotive, Pan American Airways, Menasco, American Airlines, Western Airlines, Bendix, Hockaday Inc., Adel Precision and the United States Army Air Forces all sent representatives as Mentors and Judges for the contests.

Prizes and trophies were awarded and it was “Big Doings” at Olive Rec here in town. Precision Model building tool sets, Books, War Bonds and Medals were also given to the winners.

Over 400 youth were participants in the annual event. From all the faces in the photos the kids were real happy to participate!

For more pictures click the link below…

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPKuQ2XDKfImCdLbiIK-Ae5siNd01cJf_ehRCgKDDWzhFGwnNpMHfaGc0vuZj_PPg?key=VWt6T09OMFBQMC1yZVR6ZnlEclF1UF91UGRNRHVn

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael McDaniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

and their new book, Growing Up in Burbank, just out!!

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: The Old Trapper’s Lodge

Many may remember the Legend of the Old Trapper’s Lodge, many may not, some believe it is a myth, some will believe, if they see proof. Whatever side you are on we are here to tell you that the place was real and thanks to the good people at Pierce College for preserving much of this California Historical Landmark’s Folk art is still with us.

It was moved there and preserved for future generations at the College campus near their equestrian area. John Ehn was a real trapper who dreamed of creating a place with character that people could stay at and stroll through a wonderful folk art decorated setting that both entertains and recounts stories of a bygone era.

My favorite part is the Boot Hill cemetery with its colorfully worded headstones and designs.

While the Old Trapper may not have been the best artist, he poured his soul into these works of art and we are grateful that these homages to the past, and now homages to our local history are still with us to enjoy.

For the complete series of photos click here…

 https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPwTc2FIbm7DZzg54RALY8VsvUGCyFHaSoO4Jrs4LzRinPk0s91p8K4JYLFsJh0Zg?key=SlQ3UllZbTByeVlpVXlmRE1pNV83ajlKQkk3MUpB

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael McDaniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

and their new book, Growing Up in Burbank, just out!!

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Burbank on Parade

I was saddened recently to hear that after over 60+ years of Burbank On Parade that there will be no more of this Grand Celebration of all things Burbank.

This feeling I have was added to by a group of photos sent to Wes and I at Burbankia by the Son of Eudell McGinnis.

Mr. McGinnis took a number of Kodachrome slides in the early 1950’s including a number of Burbank On Parade pictures in brilliant color. At this time the parade was on San Fernando Road and headed north along the very crowded street.

These photos give us a wonderful glimpse into the past with very red fire engines, the Major theater in its glory, along with brightly colored banners and clothes and balloons, store fronts and some great 50’s cars!

Also included are photos of Vicroy Park, City hall, Bell Jeff, the original Library on Olive plus many others.

Here are these wonderful Burbank On Parade pictures.

For the rest of Mr McGinnis’s photos click here… https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPAvzDndUztKenObvDyFy5t-MxbVTBTZDekR-OHwjjUEScD2JR3y5ooCBMk1Txe7Q?key=Q3Rjb1dMZ1JDRXVWbzZ4R015RjlhbXM2Zk91UmVB

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael McDaniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

and their new book, Growing Up in Burbank, just out!!

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: San Val Drive In

Most people remember the Pickwick Drive in Theater, but lesser known on the opposite end of town was the San Val Drive in.

Located on the triangular corner where Winona & Naomi meet San Fernando Road. In the early days of the 1930’s and 40’s this theater used bullhorns instead of speakers to get the sound near your car meaning you had to leave the windows down.

During WWII the theater was painted in camouflage colors to disguise it from the air. It was also very close to Lockheed and the Airport, hence the need for the camouflage  paint scheme.

This was a very popular drive in as it had people from north Hollywood & Sun Valley attend also making it packed on most weekends.

Sadly, as with most drive in theaters, the San Val went the way of the Pickwick but we have many photos of this once great Burbank Drive in.

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael McDaniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

and their new book, Growing Up in Burbank, just out!!

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Big Boy! A Burbank Tradition

Bobs on San Fernando Rd – 1948

We are a lucky people here in Burbank. We are one of a few City’s that still has a Bob’s Big Boy restaurant on the edge of the city near Toluca Lake.

Bob’s was originally a local enterprise begun by Bob Wian. The Big Boy the signature Burger was originally made as a joke for a customer who asked Wian for “something different”. It caught on and soon everyone wanted one!

Bob began to expand his idea and opened a Bob’s at 624 S. San Fernando Road in Burbank. It was a small place with a tall neon sign featuring a character known as Big Boy eating a hamburger. This Bob’s was remodeled to the 1950’s Googie Architecture style of Coffee Shops of the time.

The Toluca Lake Bob’s the one original still left here today is a “California Point of Historical Interest”. In 1993 original Architect Wayne McAllister helped save his creation from the wrecking ball campaigning for its inclusion on the list of California Point of historical interest, thereby saving Bob’s #6 for us to enjoy the food we grew up with and introducing new generations to the Big Boy!

The Friday night car show at Bob’s is a must see event each week. If you are lucky Jay Leno has been known to show up with one of his car collection every now and then.

So just one more great thing that makes Burbank great and one thing that we have here that the rest of the country can only dream of. After all this, I feel like a Big Boy Combo is in my future today.

See you there!

The interior 1948 boy is it packed! Good food will do that!

Same Location after 50’s remodel. Early 1970’s

Coming on November 27, 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Magnolia Park

Magnolia Park 1927

On the western end of Magnolia in Burbank is an area of homes and shops know as Magnolia Park.

Earl White with Betty Gerry

In the 1920’s, a project to build homes and a shopping district was begun.

Hopes were high and plans were laid out to make this a fantastic area to live and to shop. To draw attention to the area of Magnolia, the promoter Earl L. White pulled out all the stops and hired several Silent movie actresses to show off the new development and bring in buyers and businesses.

Within a short few years there were 3500 homes and a new business district on Magnolia Blvd itself.

As they say the rest is history as today Magnolia park is a bustling hub of shops, restaurants, antique stores and other fine eclectic businesses.

Here are some photos from the 1928 promotional pictures featuring actresses, Betty Baker, Betty Gerry, Dorothy Gulliver, Ann Carter and Billie Barnes.

BETTY BAKER

BETTY BAKER

BETTY BAKER

Betty Gerry

Betty Gerry

Betty Gerry

ANN CARTER

BILLIE BARNS

BILLIE BARNS

BILLIE BARNS

Coming on November 27, 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Starlight Theater/Bowl

A Burbank Icon is the hillside amphitheater known as the Starlight Bowl.

Originally called the Starlight Theater it was once part of the Oliver Stough Property located in a natural canyon in the Verdugo mountains. Upon obtaining  the property from the Stough family Ben Marks had a vision of making a huge college campus with first class amenities including a beautiful amphitheater in the hills above the campus.

When the bid for UCLA was lost, Marks started the Benmar Hills development, a housing project for the land. Not lost on the City of Burbank was his plan for the hillside amphitheater part of the original project.

The City acquired the land and made a small development that included a wood platform (stage) with backdrop and when needed a canopy to cover performers. For seating the city built split log benches (ouch) in 3 sections with the two outer sections angled to better face the stage.

As time went on a BBQ & picnic facility were added and in time a WWI memorial was placed in the center of what has become Stough Park at the base of the bowl.

It also included a rock pond for swimming. In time a Symphony orchestra would play during the summer season and later theatrical performances were added once the permanent stage and seating were constructed.

During the 60’s, rock concerts were held with many famous bands gracing the stage. In the 1980’s even Weird Al brought his musical talents to the Bowl.

Today the Bowl is still the place to be with it’s views of the city, and musical acts during the Summer Concert Season that starts with the 4th of July Spectacular. The City has always shot off their 4th fireworks display from the Bowl parking lot as far back as the 1950’s!

If you have not had the opportunity you owe it to yourself to visit and enjoy this fine venue as thousands of people have done since the 1920’s.

WWI Memorial Still there today minus the flag pole.

 

 

 

 

 

BBQ and Picnic facilities

 

 

 

 

 

Rock Wading pool addition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming on November 27, 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

 

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: From San Francisco With Love

In the Early 1800’s a Man named David Burbank cane from the east to start a new life and practice Dentistry.

He settled in San Francisco and “Hung out his Shingle” Literally!

Long before he came to the San Fernando Valley to become a sheep farmer and alfalfa Grower, Dr Burbank set up his business in the Express Building on Montgomery Street in San Francisco.

Not much is known about his time in Frisco, so how do we know where his business was?

From a very interesting photo from a Historical archive up north. The photo clearly shows Dr Burbank’s “Shingle” and the street scene dated 1855 in San Francisco. Take a look at this very historical photo that has more meaning to us here in Burbank than it does for San Francisco. Also compare to the Dr. Burbank sign on display at the Burbank Historical Society. 162 years old!

Enjoy!

Coming on November 27, 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Villa Cabrini / Woodbury

About a year ago, We took a look at Mother Cabrini the first American Saint canonized by the Pope.

Today, I want to focus on her little known school for girls “Villa Cabrini”!

The school was a beautiful campus at the edge of Burbank on Glenoaks. Thousands of girls over the schools long run went from grade school through high school because of Saint Cabrini’s foresight to build a school of this type when Burbank Schools only had a few schools.

The school offered Classes in Science, Math, Home Economics, Arts, Drama, History, Physical Education, Gardening, Horsemanship and of course Religion.

The teachers were well educated and capable. All of the operations were overseen by the Mother Superior who was personally chosen for the task by Mother Cabrini herself before her passing.

We see pictures and stories about Burbank Schools, BHS, JBHS, the fine Jr Highs, our great elementary schools, and the several fine Parochial Schools in town. Rarely do we hear of this fine school let alone see pictures of this academy that pre-dated many of the Burbank schools giving opportunity to gain a first class education to thousands of young girls helping them to become educated young women.

Today we should pause and remember this Saintly Italian immigrant who blessed Burbank with her presence and a wonderful school that would become the City’s Woodbury University. Take a look at the following photos that most have never seen of this school in its heyday.

Enjoy!

Coming in November of 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: The Magnolia Theater

Back in March we talked about the Cornell Theater today we will travel back to another Theater that holds many memories for Burbankers on that edge of town.

1949

The Magnolia Theater was located just inside the Burbank border on Magnolia and Valley Street. Built in 1940’s it was fantastic theater to go to especially at night with the large towering marquee that cast a glow over the whole street.

Designed by Jaques De Forest Griffin who said it was to be a modified French style, topped with a 170 foot pylon inspired by the Eiffel Tower. The cost was estimated at the time at $50,000.

The theater was extensively remodeled in 1964 to include a new marquee, refrigerated air conditioning, a new box office and the front façade done in Italian Marble at a cost of $60,000. The Theater boasted an 800 seat auditorium and a 300 car parking lot.

The theater went out of business and was remodeled into a recording studio reportedly owned by Will Smith but we have no proof of that. The building is still there today with the shape basically the same but with all the marquee removed and earth tone paint to make it no longer stand out.

I had the great fortune to have seen a number of movies over the 1960’s there, the best were with John Wayne and I remember the last movie I saw there was in 1975 called ROLLERBALL.

The Magnolia was a great example of the  movie palace style theaters and as a child no one had to ask me twice to go there as in my young mind it was the coolest awe inspiring way to have a day at the Movies.

So if you are ever down that way take a look at a Burbank icon!

 

1959

A sad site for movie goers

The Magnolia as it looks today

Coming in November of 2017….

Growing Up in Burbank

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Get your Copy of Lost Burbank Now!
lost-in-burbank-book-coverSlowly fading with the city’s ever-changing landscape, the places and people of Burbank’s past tell a vibrant story. Before the arrival of Warner Bros. and Walt Disney, First National Pictures built  its original studio lot on Olive Ave in 1926. For over sixty years, Lockheed Aircraft Company produced some of the nation’s best airplanes where the massive Empire Shopping Center now stands. Heavyweight champion James Jeffries turned his Burbank ranch home and barn into a beloved landmark and boxing venue. Inventor Joseph Wesley Fawkes’s scheme to build a monorail to Los Angeles became a local laughingstock.  Diehard Burbankers Wes Clark and Michael Mc Daniel collect these and many more forgotten local stories where they can finally be found.