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L.A. Sheriff’s Department Rolls Out Project Lifesaver To Find Critical Missing Persons With Autism And Alzheimer’s

Burbank residents and law enforcement have a new tool for finding missing persons with cognitive and communication disabilities, such as Alzheimer’s, dementia and autism. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department has taken up the mantel of piloting a tracking technology program, Project Lifesaver, for finding individuals wearing the transmitter wristband who wander away in L.A. County.

For those who go missing in Burbank while wearing the Project Lifesaver wristband, Burbank Police can call upon the LASD to assist in locating the missing person.

Over the past several months, the L.A. Sheriff’s Department has been training staff in the use of the tracking technology, including work in the field. More than 12 operators have already trained and six more are currently in training, according to Lt. John Gannon of the LASD Mental Evaluation Team (MET.)

Just last month, in July, seven LASD regional trainers worked directly with Project Lifesaver representatives. Those lead trainers are now instructing other Department members, so the LASD will have a large number of practiced and ready team members to respond to regional deployments and mutual aid requests.

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L.A. Sheriff’s Deputies Daniel Cerda and Vincent Ortiz coordinate with other units to narrow the search for the transmitter. (Photo Courtesy Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department)

This fall, LASD plans to meet with Search and Rescue teams to train volunteers as Project Lifesaver operators. Gannon anticipates the group of trained personnel within L.A. County to reach more than 50 by the end of 2018. The goal is to provide ample staff from throughout the county to respond when a person wearing the tracking technology goes missing.

“The deputies and DMH [Department of Mental Health] clinicians at the MET enjoy the challenge of using the equipment to locate the hidden transmitters during training,” commented Gannon. “I’ve been very impressed at the level of interest and commitment of our team to embrace this program.”

“I think our personnel are excited at the prospect of helping to locate a critical missing person using this technology. We like helping people and we like problem solving and overcoming challenges.”

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LASD Deputies Joe MIranda and TJ Johnson coordinate with other units to narrow the search for the Project LIfesaver transmitter. (Photo Courtesy Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department)

“We all chose this profession to help people and there’s nobody we like helping more than our most vulnerable citizens, which this technology is especially well-suited for,” he said. “I think our staff envisions themselves finding that critical lost person who needs us and they take the training very seriously.”

The Project Lifesaver program will officially be up and running by September 5, when the L.A. County Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services Department hosts a press conference. The LASD will be on hand that day with helicopter and ground units for display.

The program has an initial group of 130 transmitters to be issued to qualified low-income individuals with cognitive and communication disabilities in August. Families and caregivers may also purchase the transmitter from Project Lifesaver for approximately $300. All Los Angeles County residents with the transmitter are encouraged to register with the County database.

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LASD Sergeant Kevin Tiwari teaches deputies about the equipment before conducting field searches. (Photo Courtesy Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department)

“There are multiple technologies that complete in this ever-expanding marketplace to help protect senior citizens and persons with developmental disabilities who may wander,” said Gannon. “Virtually any of the technologies available are better than having no protection at all.”

“For some, elopement is a matter of life and death and we have a limited window of opportunity to find missing people before they encounter very real danger. The end result of wandering can be fatal without swift intervention.”

“So, it’s very important for families to consider all options, evaluate the pros and cons of each and find the technology that best meets their needs. No matter which option they choose, your local police and sheriff’s department teams should be able to help bring them back home more quickly if they are properly equipped.”

“For those families who opt for Project Lifesaver transmitters, the LASD is now equipped with receivers, which makes this option viable for those who prefer not to pay annual or monthly service fees,” he added.

While the LASD and some local police departments have received extensive autism communication and de-escalation tactics training, others are still developing training in dealing with those members of the community with communication and behavior impairments.

“We are exposed to autism training through the POST (Police Officers Standards and Training) training videos, both sworn and non-sworn have attended the L.A. DA’s Mental Health Awareness training,” explained Burbank Police training officer, Sergeant Cindy Guillen. “In regards to de-escalation training, there is nothing specific to autism training [for the Burbank Police Department.]”

Finding missing people with autism, Alzheimer’s and dementia is one aspect of the larger interactions of law enforcement and citizens with mental, emotional and behavioral disabilities. Training is essential for successful contact with many at-risk individuals, particularly those with autism and limited communication and cognitive abilities.

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Members of the L.A Sheriff’s Department Mental Evaluation Team (MET) (left to right): Deputy Vincent Ortiz, Deputy TJ Johnson, Sergeant Kevin Tiwari and Deputy Joe Miranda. The MET conducted a mock search in the field where the transponder was placed a half a mile away in a bush and located within 10 minutes. (Photo Courtesy Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department)

“Most people with autism have communication and sensory challenges, but their symptoms are ‘invisible’ – in other words, there aren’t any distinct physical characteristics for someone with autism,” commented Kate Movius, who currently works with LASD on autism communication and de-escalation tactics training. “For this reason, people with autism can easily be misunderstood as being rude, strange or non-compliant.”

“When law enforcement becomes involved, the typical methods used to de-escalate a situation often won’t work for someone with communication and sensory challenges,” she explained. “Providing specialized training for law enforcement gives the officers more tools to use in these types of encounters.”

“We work a lot on non-verbal communication tactics and an overall emphasis on how to slow down and simplify commands and wait for a response from the autistic person.”

Movius has also conducted training for Glendale, South Pasadena, West Covina and Pasadena Police Departments.

“Project Lifesaver provides a potentially life-saving tool for people who wander,” Movius added. “Nearly 49% of children with autism will attempt to wander or ‘bolt’ – often several times. For many with autism, this risk continues into adulthood.”

More information on L.A. County’s new program with Project Lifesaver and details about how the tracking technology works can be found in this previously published myBurbank article.

This article is Part 2 of a two-part series detailing the L.A. Sheriff’s Department pilot program of Project Lifesaver, a tracking technology used to find missing persons with Alzheimer’s, dementia and autism. Families and caregivers who wish to apply for a free transmitter or sign up for the tracking database should contact Veronica Sigala at the L.A. County Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services Department at 213-910-1662.

Project Lifesaver Aids Search For Missing Persons With Alzheimer’s And Autism

Members of the Burbank community, and Los Angeles County, now have a new tool to help find loved ones with Alzheimer’s, dementia and autism who are prone to wandering. The Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department is rolling out the pilot Project Lifesaver tracking program county-wide, and interested families and caregivers are encouraged to sign up with the Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services Department.

This program is part of L.A. County Supervisors Janice Hahn and Kathryn Barger’s “Bringing Our Loved Ones Home” Task Force, which implements safety improvements in the county and addresses the many loved ones with cognitive and communication impairments who wander away or go missing every year.

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Project Lifesaver transmitter and receiver. (Photo Courtesy Project Lifesaver)

In the Supervisors’ initiative, Hahn directly points to the Project Lifesaver program that Glendale Police Department piloted last year.

Individuals wear a wristband with a transmitter that can send signals to a handheld receiver.

While the wristband is not continually monitored, once the wearer is reported missing, receivers are activated to find that wristband’s frequency and the missing person can be located by using multiple receivers to triangulate the signal.

According to Hahn’s website, “There are currently 19 individuals enrolled in the Glendale Police Department program. Of the 19 individuals enrolled, seven have wandered away from [a] loved one and have gone missing. The police were able to bring all seven individuals home safely.”

“Finding a missing person in L.A. County, the most populated county in the nation with over 10 million population, is literally like looking for a needle in a haystack, at times,” commented Lt. John Gannon, of the LASD’s Mental Evaluation Team (MET.)

“Now, for families who opt for Project Lifesaver or similar technologies… a transmitter will send us (law enforcement) a signal when that lost person cannot call for us themselves.”

Time is of the essence in locating any missing person, and those with cognitive and communication impairments pose a tougher challenge. When a person from the Burbank community wearing the transmitter goes missing, Gannon says caregivers should call 911.

“It is absolutely critical to tell the 911 operator the person is wearing a Project Lifesaver wristband transmitter – or other technology the family subscribes to,” he emphasizes. “This allows Burbank PD to immediately notify LASD so we can summon the team and get on our way without any unnecessary delays.”

“If the person is found, we can always turn back,” Gannon added. “But we would rather get moving in that direction without delay so our first LASD team member arriving can try to pick up the signal and radio to other responding units where they need to go to triangulate and locate the individual.”

“Early notice also allows us to notify the helicopter crew to lift off and/or respond to Burbank with a receiver. The sooner the better.”

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Members of the L.A Sheriff’s Department Mental Evaluation Team (MET) (left to right): Deputy Vincent Ortiz, Deputy TJ Johnson, Sergeant Kevin Tiwari and Deputy Joe Miranda. The MET conducted a mock search in the field where the transponder was placed a half a mile away in a bush and located within 10 minutes. (Photo Courtesy Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department)

The LASD has a large number of trained staff able to respond to critical missing person requests at all times. The Department has pre-staged receiver equipment at various locations countywide to reduce response time and they also have two receivers for county helicopters to help pick up the signal more quickly.

“Burbank Police Department may request LASD to respond via mutual aid to assist with any lost critical missing person in Burbank wearing a Project Lifesaver transmitter,” explained Gannon. “We work as a team in partnership with the requesting agency. They remain the lead agency, of course.”

“LASD is there to provide the search capability and logistics. We will likely partner each of our personnel with local agency officers who are most familiar with their city.”

The range of the transmitter depends on the environment – ground units may only get 1/4 to 1/2 mile range in a dense city with tall buildings. Helicopters can receive the signal up to five miles away.

“During recent training in the San Gabriel Valley, we were typically receiving the signal approximately three miles out from where the person wearing the transmitter was ultimately found,” said Gannon. “Average time to locate patients was about 18 minutes… but that’s with good last seen direction and approximate time of how long ago they were last seen.”

“A wandering person can traverse three to five miles in an hour. We need that last known witness info and elapsed time ASAP so we can map out our strategy for deploying the locators.”

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Project Lifesaver transmitter looks like a watch. (Photo Courtesy Project Lifesaver)

Project Lifesaver uses radio frequency (RF) technology similiar to Lo-Jack and AM/FM radio stations, added Gannon.

“It’s proven dependable technology for many years,” he said. “It is not dependent upon cellular towers or carriers to transmit a signal. Unlike GPS signals, RF technology will operate through most walls and roof materials without need for an open line-of-sight to satellite(s.)”

“RF does have limitations like all wireless technologies do. Every technology has inevitable points of failure and nothing is ever 100%. However, Project Lifesaver program and the RF technology has proven to be reliable during thousands of searches nationwide for well over a decade now.”

“Like any tool, it’s only as good as its operators,” Gannon continued. “Therefore, the commitment to Project Lifesaver from the county and the Sheriff’s Department is critically important to ensure skilled operators are always reachable 24 hours and seven days per week.”

“That’s why the LASD has committed the Mental Evaluation Team and Communication & Fleet Management Bureau as the co-lead for this program. They are supported by Sheriff’s Aero Bureau personnel who are specifically trained to operate the airborn equipment countywide.”

A limited number of the Project Lifesaver transmitters are available for free through the County for low-income, at risk individuals with Alzheimer’s, dementia and autism, according to Veronica Sigala, Adult Protective Services Program & Planning Program Manager for the L.A. County Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services Department.

Families and caregivers may also purchase the Project Lifesaver transmitter for approximately $300. There are no monthly or annual fees and the first year of batteries are included.

Lt. Gannon encourages those families who purchase their own transmitter register with Sigala to ensure L.A. County can include them in the tracker database.

This article is Part 1 of a two-part series detailing the L.A. Sheriff’s Department pilot of Project Lifesaver, a tracking technology program used to find missing persons with cognitive and communication disabilities. Part 2 details more of the LASD training with Project Lifesaver. Families and caregivers who wish to apply for a free transmitter or sign up for the tracking database should contact Veronica Sigala at the L.A. County Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services Department at 213-910-1662.