Tag Archives: rep[lacement terminal

Human Health Risk Assessment Report Brings New Terminal Closer

At this morning’s Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority meeting, the Authority Commission authorized the finalization and submission of the Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) to the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Los Angeles Region; the State Office of Environmental Human Hazard Assessment; and the City of Burbank. Finalization and submission of the HHRA to the designated agencies is one of the steps in the replacement passenger terminal process and follows the Airport Authority’s submission of the Airport Layout Plan (ALP) to the Federal Aviation Administration on June 30.

The HHRA was prepared by Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., for a portion of the Lockheed Plant B-6 site commonly known as the Adjacent Property, which is the preferred site for the replacement passenger terminal project. Geosyntec has summarized its findings and stated that: “The Adjacent Property is compatible for the construction of and operation of a replacement passenger terminal and associated facilities.”

The HHRA is based on the results of soil and soil gas sampling services on the Adjacent Property, was performed by EFI Global, Inc. under a contract awarded by the Commission on February 6, 2017. EFI Global conducted the sampling work in February and March, analyzing 74 soil samples and 137 soil vapor samples. EFI Global’s sampling work was conducted pursuant to a work plan approved by representatives of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Los Angeles Region. The sampling was designed to cover an extensive range of locations from four principal areas: the Desmond leasehold in the north, the unpaved central portion of the property, the employee lot, and the Lot A parking location to the southern portion of the Adjacent Property (designated as “Lot A East” on the attached map). Two accredited environmental laboratories analyzed the samples and EFI Global prepared a 12,700-page summary report, including all laboratory reports, boring logs, chain-of-custody documents and waste disposal manifests.

The HHRA utilizes risk screening levels to calculate the potential health risks to two types of individuals: construction contractor employees building the proposed project and future employees at the replacement passenger terminal, including vendor employees, Transportation Security Administration staff and others. Risk screening levels determine whether the risk posed by chemicals detected in the environment is at a de minimis level or is at a level that would require a more detailed site-specific review.

Based upon standard screening levels published by both the California Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Geosyntec has concluded that the calculated cancer risks and noncancer hazard indexes are at or below the de minimis level for construction workers and Airport workers. Because the calculated cancer risk and noncancer hazard indexes are below de minimis levels for full-time Airport workers, Geosyntec’s report concludes that “the risk and hazard to an occasional Airport visitor would also be below de minimis levels.”

Geosyntec has also recommended that the Authority implement a Soil Management Plan to minimize soil and dust exposure to both the construction workers and to neighboring property owners and users. The Authority has already committed to implementing a Soil Management Plan as part of project design features contained in the Final Environmental Impact Report and the Development Agreement for the replacement passenger terminal project, and Geosyntec can assist in recommending specific measures to further reduce exposure during the construction phase. This recommendation is not based upon a particular risk level, but rather is intended as a further proactive measure to further reduce potential exposures during the construction process.

The HHRA is now available to the public on the Airport’s replacement passenger terminal website, BURreplacementterminal.com. If the agencies to whom the HHRA is submitted request minor revisions, such as additional tables for data display, a modified HHRA will be provided to the City of Burbank and be made available on the replacement passenger terminal website for public inspection.

EFI Global analyzed 74 soil samples and 137 soil vapor samples from a variety of locations across four
principal areas: the Desmond Leasehold, the Unpaved Central Area,
the Employee Lot/Lot A West and Lot A East.

Airport Authority Releases Final Environmental Impact Report on Replacement Terminal

The Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority has released the Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) on the proposed 14-gate Replacement Terminal at the Hollywood Burbank Airport. The document examines the potential environmental impacts that a 355,000-square-foot Replacement Terminal might have on the surrounding community and identifies mitigation measures to lessen those impacts. A special commission meeting to consider certification of the FEIR is scheduled for Monday, July 11, 2016, at 9 a.m. in the Airport Skyroom.

NEWEST replacement terminal 6-28-16The Airport Authority began the environmental review process in November, 2015, when the Airport Authority Commission and the Burbank City Council endorsed a Conceptual Term Sheet that would give the Airport Authority the vested right to build a 14-gate Replacement Terminal in exchange for permanent new protections for Burbank. Under the provisions of Measure B, the voters in Burbank must approve any agreement between the City of Burbank and the Airport Authority, or any other discretionary action for a replacement terminal, before that agreement can become effective.

The FEIR examines three development options to replace the existing 14-gate, 232,000-square-foot passenger terminal which is located too close to the runways, and portions of which were built in 1930 and do not meet current earthquake design standards. The preferred option is a 355,000-square-foot replacement terminal on the B-6 Adjacent Property, located in the northeast quadrant of the Airport, off of Hollywood Way and Winona Ave. The existing terminal would be demolished after the replacement terminal is opened.

The FEIR forecasts an increase in enplanements and operations by 2025, but it does not attribute this growth to the proposed project, since the replacement terminal would not increase the number of gates or lengthen Airport runways. The Airport currently operates well below the number of passengers it accommodated between 2006 and 2008, and the FEIR does not project that such a level of activity would occur again within the study period, regardless of whether or not a replacement terminal is built.

Additionally, the FEIR forecasts that the impacts of each of the three development options would be generally the same or similar to the impacts that would occur under the “no project” alternative. These impacts would be related to the relocation of the terminal, not to the increase in aircraft operations or annual passengers.

The FEIR can be viewed online at www.BURreplacementterminal.com. Copies of the FEIR are available for public viewing at Burbank, Glendale, and Pasadena City Halls; the Buena Vista, Central, and Northwest Libraries in Burbank; the Glendale Central Library; the Pasadena Public Library; Valley Plaza Library in North Hollywood; and the Airport Authority offices.

On July 7, 2016, the City of Burbank Planning Board will consider the FEIR, Development Agreement and minor Planned Development amendments for the 14-gate Replacement Terminal. The Burbank City Council public hearings on the project are scheduled for July 25 and July 26. The Authority seeks a November 8, 2016, Measure B election.

Airport Authority releases Draft Environmental Impact Report on 14-gate Replacement Terminal

The Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority has released the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) on the proposed 14-gate Replacement Terminal at the Burbank Bob Hope Airport. The document examines the potential impacts a 355,000-square-foot Replacement Terminal might have on the community and suggests possible mitigation measures to lessen those impacts. The DEIR release initiates a 45-day public review and comment period that will extend through June 13.

“The release of the DEIR marks a major milestone for this Airport,” said Frank Quintero, president of the Airport Authority Commission. “We look forward to hearing from the community and area stakeholders after they take the time to review this very important document.”

Formal comments on the DEIR can be made online at www.replaceburterminal.com or at any of the upcoming Airport public meetings. Copies of the complete DEIR are available for public viewing at Burbank, Glendale, and Pasadena City Halls; the Buena Vista, Central, and Northwest Libraries in Burbank; the Glendale Central Library; the Pasadena Public Library; Valley Plaza Library in North Hollywood; and the Burbank Bob Hope Airport Authority offices. The complete DEIR is also available online at the Airport’s Replacement Terminal website, www.burreplacementterminal.com.

The Airport will hold three upcoming community meetings where the public can learn more about the DEIR and comment on the document. These meetings will take place on:

  • Thursday, May 19, 2016, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m., at the Burbank Community Services Building, 150 N. Third St., Room 104, Burbank
  • Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m., at the Buena Vista Library, 300 N. Buena Vista St., Burbank
  • Monday, June 6, 2016, 9 a.m., at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority Meeting, 2627 Hollywood Way, Skyroom, Burbank

The DEIR examines three development options to replace the existing 14-gate, 232,000-square-foot passenger terminal, which was built in 1930. Portions of the Airport’s current terminal do not meet current earthquake design standards and the facilities are located too close to the runways. The preferred option is a 355,000-square-foot, 14-gate Replacement Terminal on the B-6 Adjacent Property, located in the northeast quadrant of the Airport, off of Hollywood Way and Winona Ave. (A map is available on the following page.) Under all three development scenarios, the existing terminal would be demolished.

In November 2015, the Airport Authority and the Burbank City Council endorsed a Conceptual Term Sheet that would give the Authority the right to build a 14-gate Replacement Terminal in exchange for new protections for Burbank. The proposed agreement between the Authority and the City would take effect only if Burbank voters approve the agreement in accordance with Measure B, a Burbank ordinance that says that any discretionary agreement between the City and the Authority must be approved by Burbank voters. The Authority seeks a November 8, 2016, Measure B election.

The DEIR examined three development options to replace the existing passenger terminal. The preferred option is a 355,000-square-foot, 14-gate Replacement Terminal on the B-6 Adjacent Property, the site indicated in green

The DEIR examined three development options to replace the existing passenger terminal. The
preferred option is a 355,000-square-foot, 14-gate Replacement Terminal on the
B-6 Adjacent Property, the site indicated in green

City of Burbank Unveils Webpage for Airport Information

The City of Burbank has unveiled a new webpage that provides the community with a repository of information regarding the proposed replacement terminal at the Burbank Bob Hope Airport.

Burbank City Council and the Airport Authority have agreed, in concept, to a proposal to replace the current terminal which was built more than 85-years ago. The proposed replacement terminal would require the approval of Burbank voters.

To help voters stay informed of the proposal and potential impacts, the City has created a webpage that offers a wealth of information, including upcoming meetings and events; official documents and agreements; archived video of public meetings; frequently asked questions; and a glossary of acronyms.

The webpage can be found by going to burbankca.gov/BURinfo or by visiting the City’s home page at burbankca.gov and clicking the “BUR Terminal Replacement Info” button. The replacement terminal information webpage will be updated with new information as it becomes available.

Those interested in being notified when new airport related information is released are encouraged to sign up for e-Notify. To register, go to the City’s homepage burbankca.gov, click the “e-Notify Me” button on the left and follow the ensuing instructions.

Airport Authority Shows What Replacement Terminal Will Look Like

Airport staff and consultants informed the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority that the recommended size of the proposed 14-gate replacement passenger terminal now under discussion in the joint Airport-City of Burbank future of the airport visioning process is 355,000 square feet. Earlier estimates had determined a general range of between 325,000 and 385,000 square feet.

The 355,000 square foot specification results from  calculating space requirements for functions, services and amenities recommended by the general public through surveys in 2012 and community workshops this summer and fall, as well as discussions with the airlines serving Bob Hope Airport.  It represents a 68% increase in size from the existing terminal which is approximately 211,000 square feet. The existing terminal building would be demolished after completion of construction of the replacement terminal.

This summer the Authority and City launched a series of study sessions and workshops to offer initial concepts of a possible replacement terminal and preliminary plans for the development of former Lockheed land next to the Airport along Hollywood Way.

The former Lockheed property includes 49 acres next to the main Airport runway that could be used for a terminal site, adjacent to 58 additional acres now referred to as the “Opportunity Site” bordering Hollywood Way that could be developed for commercial uses that complement the convergence of air, rail, and public transit in the area.

The Airport’s current terminal does not meet current seismic design standards or comply with FAA standards regarding the prescribed distance between runways and terminals. The proposed 355,000 sq. feet, 14-gate replacement terminal would be safe and modern, with the same conveniences and easy access that air travelers now enjoy, and provide additional amenities desired by the public and that are typically available in a modern airport.

These features include the same amount of short-term and valet parking spaces adjacent to the terminal, the same passenger loading and unloading using both ends of the aircraft, facilities that are compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility regulations, a variety of restaurants, more shopping choices, and additional passenger services.

The terminal would provide more restroom facilities, wider gate access corridors, larger passenger waiting areas, larger and more efficient passenger and baggage security screening areas, easy and convenient baggage claim facilities, and additional restaurants and concessions. Environmentally, the replacement terminal would also be more energy- and water-efficient.

The two-story replacement terminal would have a linear layout, with passenger functions located on the ground level. It would provide centralized functions for ticketing, passenger security screening and baggage screening, with the baggage screening facilities centralized on the airside. There would also be airside security enhancements to permit a truck dock for the central reception and screening of Airport vendor goods. The second level would primarily house airline, Authority, and TSA personnel functions.

The preliminary conceptual design of the replacement terminal features primary roadway accessibility from Hollywood Way, with secondary entry and exit from San Fernando Boulevard. The terminal curb front areas are designed with three vehicle lanes and two commercial lanes, with two lanes for terminal recirculation.

Additional proposed support facilities include a cargo building to the north end of the replacement terminal, airside access from the service road network, landside access from Cohasset Street, a central plant for environmentally “green” heating and cooling equipment. The plans also call for a replacement aircraft rescue firefighting (ARFF) station east of the current air traffic control tower.

The public involvement process continues this month with an Airport-hosted town hall meeting to discuss the replacement terminal and Opportunity Site on Thursday, October 10, at 6 p.m. in the Burbank Bob Hope Airport Terminal A Skyroom. Parking in the short-term structure will be validated.

On October 29 at 6 p.m., the Burbank City Council will consider the configuration of the replacement terminal and Opportunity Site development, to be held in the Burbank City Council Chambers. Finally, on November 14 at 6 p.m., the Burbank City Council and the Airport Authority will hold a joint special meeting to approve the general project description for the replacement terminal and Oppoatunity Site to initiate the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) process. The EIR process will look at the environmental impacts that this replacement terminal configuration could create. This meeting will be held in the Burbank Community Services Building, located at 150 N. Third Street, Burbank.

To learn more about the City and Airport Vision Process or to view the preliminary conceptual design of the proposed 14-gate replacement terminal, please visit the Airport’s City-Airport Visioning Process page at www.bobhopeairport.com/airportauthority/airport­authority/city-airport-visioning-process.html . The City of Burbank website features pages on the 58-acre Opportunity Site and Airport area planning at www.linkburbank.com and http://www.burbankca.gov/departments/community-development/planning­transportation/advance-planning/airport-area-planning-information .

Replacement Terminal proposed for Bob Hope Airport would have the same amount of gates as today's terminal (14)

Replacement Terminal proposed for Bob Hope Airport would have the same amount of gates as today’s terminal (14)